buy sensory deprivation tank

5 Costs to Consider Before You Buy a Float Tank

Whether you've been floating for years or just heard about it recently and have only experienced it one or two times, it's pretty easy to become hooked on that post-float feeling after you get out of the tank.

Your mind is calm and quiet, your skin is softer, your body feels almost reborn again, and every ounce of stress, pain, or tension you were once feeling is now completely non-existent. Sound familiar? 

So now you've only got one of two options. Pay to visit a float center in your area (if you happen to even live near one) or really take your float practice to the next level by buying a float tank for your home. 

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5 costs to consider before you purchase a float tank

 

1. The Float Tank Itself

This is the most obvious cost to consider but it can also vary a lot depending on what type of float tank model you choose to purchase. Most float tank manufacturers should offer pricing right on their website but some may require you to fill out a form with your name and email. 

Expect to pay anywhere from around $2,000 up to $30,000+ depending on the type of tank. A complete breakdown of all the different float tank types can be found in this post

 

2. Shipping Costs

In most cases you will have to contact the float tank manufacturer directly to find out pricing based on your shipping address. The price can vary a lot depending on where you live around the world and also the weight of the actual float tank itself. While some tanks like the Zen Float Tank are designed to be light and easily shippable in one boxes, more commercial type models will require the tank to be delivered on a truck and professional installation

Expect to pay anywhere from $100 up to $1000+ for shipping.

 

3. Epsom Salt

Most people assume that buying a bulk order of epsom salt is going to cost thousands upon thousands of dollars. When in fact, epsom salt has become a lot more affordable to ship in bulk over the last couple of years with the rise of the float industry. Some websites offer live freight quotes while others will require you to fill out a form or order by phone to calculate shipping rates to your area. 

Expect to pay anywhere from $500 up to $1000 for a pallet of epsom salt.

 

4. Water care and maintenance supplies 

When it comes to storing 200+ gallons of water in your home, there is going to be a certain level of water care required in addition to the filtration system included with your tank. The main supplies you'll need are a hydrometer, PH Up and PH down, Hydrogen Peroxide (preferably 35%), test strips, and a water skimmer. The nice thing is that all of these items can be found online, through Amazon, or at your local pool supply store. Some may even be included with your float tank purchase. 

Expect anywhere from $50-$100 a year for supplies.

 

5. Ongoing costs 

Last but not least of costs to consider are the ongoing costs. What makes owning a float tank nice is that after you've invested in your initial setup, there are only a small amount of ongoing costs to maintain it. In a lot of cases, you will even recoup your initial investment within the first 1-2 years of owning a float tank if you happen to already be floating at a center more than 3-4 times a month. The main ongoing costs are going to be the electrical costs to heat the tank as well as buying and replacing the epsom salt every 2 years or so.

While we can’t speak for everyone because electricity rates can vary so much between country to country and even state to state, you can expect to pay anywhere between $20-$100/month to heat your float tank. 

Is owning a float tank right for you?

Buying a float tank is sort of like buying a car. You don't just buy a car and then never put another dime into it again. You have to pay for gas, regular oil changes, monthly insurance and every so often you're required to invest in a new set of tires or brakes.

However, we typically justify paying these costs because of the convenience of having your own car as opposed to taking public transportation or the freedom that having your own car gives you to go where you want and drive yourself or whomever you please. 

This same concept applies to buying a float tank. At first you might think, "Wow, isn't this a huge investment just for my health and well-being?" but in the long run, owning your very own float tank also gives you the ability to float whenever at your convenience. 

 

Ready to get floating? Learn more about the Zen Float Tank, the world’s most affordable float tank.

DIY Float Tank vs Buying

Thinking of building a sensory deprivation tank? This post will help you compare the choice of DIY vs Buying

So you want to be able to experience the benefits of floating from home. Do you build a float tank or just buy one? That is the question. 

Just a few years ago the choice between building a DIY tank or buying a float tank use to be a very easy one if the main concern was cost. 

You were going to spend at least $12,000+ for a new one or you might find a used one on Craigslist for around $6,000 if you were really lucky. Even then, you would have to freight it in and some how move it into your home. Not an easy task.

So with the cost of building a float tank at only $2,500-$3,000, the DIY route used to be the most affordable option. However, the invention of the Float Tent changed all of that drastically.

Now, you can own a float tank for around $2,000 and have it shipped anywhere in the world for relatively nothing. This is a big game changer and largely why our Kickstarter back in April of 2014 did so well.

Though there still are reasons you may consider building over buying. Let's cover them below: 

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The Pros of a DIY Float Tank

Basically, if you are a handy builder type you may enjoy the process of crafting your own tank just how you like it. You could could make it bigger, or smaller, or do a killer outer design. You could make it match your float room perfectly. All sorts of ideas come to mind.

You could even do a Float Room which would allow you to stand up in the tank when getting in. The options are endless, but the budget will be too. If you build a bare bones DIY float tank like the one on IsolationTankPlans.com, it's going to run you at least $3,000+ and that doesn't include the salt. 

The other pro would be sound dampening. Currently the Float Tent does not provide much sound dampening, but usually a float room is quiet and you're wearing ear plugs when you float so it's not an issue. Seriously, go lay down in your bathtub with your earplugs in and your ears under water–you won't be able to hear much.

Or the other option would be to custom build a float room that's quiet and still get a Float Tent. Your call on that one but it comes down again to how much time and money you want to save in the process.

 

The Pros of Buying A Tank

I've personally gone down both routes and can speak from experience that the most convenient and affordable way to float at home is in a Float Tent. 

You'll save time from buying over building, which will ensure that you'll be floating that much sooner. Not to mention, the Float Tent comes with a 10-year warranty so if anything goes wrong, you're covered.

The other big advantage is that they are light and easy to ship, so it doesn’t matter where you are in the world. Plus, they're portable in case you need to move or relocate.